Archives

  • 2018-07
  • 2019-04
  • 2019-05
  • 2019-06
  • 2019-07
  • 2019-08
  • 2019-09
  • 2019-10
  • 2019-11
  • 2019-12
  • 2020-01
  • 2020-02
  • 2020-03
  • 2020-04
  • 2020-05
  • 2020-06
  • 2020-07
  • 2020-08
  • 2020-09
  • 2020-10
  • 2020-11
  • 2020-12
  • 2021-01
  • 2021-02
  • 2021-03
  • 2021-04
  • 2021-05
  • 2021-06
  • 2021-07
  • 2021-08
  • 2021-09
  • 2021-10
  • 2021-11
  • 2021-12
  • 2022-01
  • 2022-02
  • 2022-03
  • 2022-04
  • 2022-05
  • 2022-06
  • 2022-07
  • 2022-08
  • 2022-09
  • 2022-10
  • 2022-11
  • 2022-12
  • 2023-01
  • The radiographic correlate will be similarly important

    2022-12-01

    The radiographic correlate will be similarly important for the success of other non-VEGF TKIs, such as those targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor expressed in 50% of high-grade primary Fmoc-His(Boc)-OH.CHA neoplasms. It has been reported that icotinib and gefitinib, epidermal growth factor receptor–TKIs used in lung cancer treatment, lead to temporary complete resolution of brain metastases. These TKIs will have their own significant effect on radiographic imaging that will need to be deciphered to accurately diagnose and stage for treatment planning. Arai et al highlighted scenarios that we will encounter with increasing frequency in modern day clinical practice—new primary tumors (including brain tumors) not behaving typically as patients might be on chronic antineoplastic medications (antiangiogenic or other molecular target therapy). Making the appropriate decisions in these patients hence relies, as ever, on the physician's awareness of and vigilance for how our diagnostic tools can help us understand the tumor response to such novel therapies. Furthermore, in the authors' own words: “In patients receiving molecular target therapy for other diseases, it is necessary to consider a more aggressive pathology than that indicated by the images.”